Medical Marijuana ‘Dabs’ Have Taken Over Southern California

“Dabbing” is a simple concept: a small amount of super-high concentrate — hash oil, wax, or another compound where so much of the marijuana plant’s plant material is removed that what’s left is between 50-to-80 percent active ingredients, a sort of grain alcohol to a bud’s wine — is put on a heated surface. A puff of smoke is emitted, and then the user inhales the entire puff of super-concentrated smoke.

The effects are immediate — and they’re intense. Folks who have used cannabis daily for 30 years report, “I am high again!” Other people not so used to the magic plant usually need to sit down for a minute or two before they can talk again. In other words, “dabbing” is a way to ingest a lot of medicine very quickly — and a way to get really fucked up.

VMC-Extract-winner

There are more concentrated forms of cannabis available on the market today than ever before — hashes, oils, waxes, a concoction called “budder,” glass, you name it. It’s surmised that a glut on the market led to this — there was too many flowers and too much bud than could be sold, and like many other commodities, a repacking or repurposing was necessary in order to find market value — and it’s also led to more of a dangerous chemical extraction process.

In order to separate the psychoactive components from the plant material, some kind of extraction process is required. A common process is “butane extraction.”

“When cannabis plant material is drenched in butane, its oils dissolve and can be captured in a container,” Dr. Jeffrey Hergenrather explains. “Instantaneously, the butane evaporates leaving only the oil behind.”

Sounds ok, but not only is this process illegal, it can also leave behind neurotoxins in your cannabis. If it smells like lighter fluid, don’t smoke it, Hergenrather writes — but it may not smell that bad, and still contain neurotoxins.

So dab away — but realize when you smoke yourself stupid, you may be literally doing so.

I think most people in California forget that they are inside the fishbowl, and quite frankly, no one does it on a level like Cali does. Oregon is very advanced in the world of marijuana, and I can’t find anyone up here that is smoking dabs like they are down in California. There was a guy at the WeedMaps booth at the High Times Medical Cannabis Cup in Los Angeles named Eric that had brought 15 grams of hash oil to smoke on day 1 alone. People in California have the dab smoking process down so well, that I even saw people walking around with torches smoking dabs while milling through the crowd.

That’s what happens when you have a State that leads the world with marijuana innovation and culture. California was the first state in the country to legalize medical marijuana, and the first to have dispensaries. Combine that with a ‘cutting edge’ minded population and LOTS of people, and you have a recipe for excellence. If you live in an area that does not have a burgeoning dabs industry, just wait, because it’s coming. As with almost anything these days, it has started in California, and the popularity will spread sooner than later.

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Hemp Is Not Pot: It’s the Economic Stimulus and Green Jobs Solution We Need

From Alternet

While Uncle Sam’s scramble for new revenue sources has recently kicked up the marijuana debate — to legalize and tax, or not? — hemp’s feasibility as a stimulus plan has received less airtime.

But with a North American market that exceeds $300 million in annual retail sales and continued rising demand, industrial hemp could generate thousands of sustainable new jobs, helping America to get back on track.

“We’re in the midst of a dark economic transition, but I believe hemp is an important facet and has tremendous economic potential,” says Patrick Goggin, a board member on the California Council for Vote Hemp, the nation’s leading industrial hemp-farming advocacy group. “Economically and environmentally, industrial hemp is an important part of the sustainability pie.”

With 25,000 known applications from paper, clothing and food products — which, according to an article in the Wall Street Journal this January, is the fastest growing new food category in North America — to construction and automotive materials, hemp could be just the crop to jump-start America’s green economy.

But growing hemp remains illegal in the U.S. The Drug Enforcement Administration has lumped the low-THC plant together with its psychoactive cousin, marijuana, making America the planet’s only industrialized nation to ban hemp production. We can import it from Canada, which legalized it in 1997. But we can’t grow it.

Continue at Alternet…

 


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