Good for Bitcoin: BRICS Countries Build New Internet to Avoid NSA Spying


BRICS countries are close to completing a brand new Internet backbone that would bypass the United States entirely and thereby protect both governments and citizens from NSA spying. This could also mean Bitcoin will have a new way to reach the world which can not be shut down by the U.S. Government.

BRICS countries are close to completing a brand new Internet backbone that would bypass the United States entirely… 

The so-called Emerging Economies – the BRICS countries – have decided to build their own Internet infrastructure, circumventing American and European wiretapping points. While this is mostly skillful geopolitical play, it spells opportunity for civil liberties online that should be harnessed.  www.privateinternetaccess.com… 

They say it is to stop U.S. spying but it more than that. The BRICS cable was already in development months before the revelations of whistleblower Edward Snowden first became public in June. It is clear there is a huge shift in power coming…. these emerging economies want more autonomy and this is the logical place to start. 

This is good news for Bitcoin. 

It means the U.S. Government won’t be able to shut down the crypto-currency and could led to its wider adoption. If Bitcoin really does become a threat to the dollar, and the dollar were displaced, the world would be better off as a result. Money would be returned to the market whence it came and leave the grasping hands of the political and financial elite who use their monopoly to exploit the rest of us. No more inflation, no more business cycles, no more multi-trillion dollar bailouts. Money would be private property, with a complete separation between money and the state.

Whether the U.S. Government likes it or not, Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies are the future of money. Just as email and texting displaced the U.S. post office, and cell phones have displaced the wall phone the government used to install for us, cryptocurrencies could become the preferred medium for conducting exchange in the age of the Internet. Indeed, with the BRICS new Internet, that prospect has been a certainty. Capital is more mobile than ever and will, over time, tend to seek out liberal jurisdictions over those that regiment every aspect of commerce. 

The U.S. has a very bad habit, one that stands in complete contradiction to the very idea of liberalism. Its most fundamental tenet is that anything that is not heavily regulated probably should be completely illegal. The notion that stuff should just be permitted to happen and take its own shape in the course of trading and competition and the like is just not part of the mindset of an imperial paranoid state like the U.S.. 

The U.S. can slow down the trend but it can’t stop it. Cryptocurrency will find a home and it will be the one that is most welcome. The nations that punish it will die and those that welcome it will thrive. Ultimately, cryptocurrency could erase borders and free humanity from the chains of state economic control. Look to those regions like these BRICS countries that are, for now, open to genuine progress.

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In light of revelations that the National Security Agency hacked German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s phone, in addition to recording information about 124 billion phone calls during a 30-day period earlier this year, the fallout against the NSA has accelerated.

Brazil is set to finalize a 34,000-kilometre undersea fiber-optic cable by 2015 that will run from Vladivostok, Russia to Fortaleza, Brazil, via Shantou, China, Chennai, India and Cape Town, South Africa.

According to the Hindu, the project will create, “a network free of US eavesdropping,” which via legislative mandates will also force the likes of Google, Facebook and Yahoo to store all data generated by BRICS nations locally, shielding it from NSA snooping.

“The BRICS countries have the muscle to pull this off,” notes Washington’s Blog. “Each of the BRICS countries are in the top 25 largest economies in the world. China has the world’s second largest economy, India is 3rd, Russia 6th, Brazil 7th, and South Africa 25th.”

However, some privacy experts fear that this will do little to stop the NSA, given that it has tapped undersea cables since the Cold War era. Others are more positive.

“Any alternative would be a positive thing, writes Michael Dorfman. “The more choice you have, the better. Yet no-one can say for sure whether this new Internet will be safer than its US counterpart and will be able to protect the rights of regular users, including the privacy of personal data and free access to resources, more effectively.”

The BRICS cable was already in development months before the revelations of whistleblower Edward Snowden first became public in June.

In September it emerged that the NSA had been spying on Brazilian government communications as well as Brazilian oil company Petrobras. Spooks hacked into the firm’s computer network to eavesdrop on conversations between CEOs.

The current Internet architecture is dominated by ICANN (the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers), which is largely controlled by the United States.

Other entrepreneurs are also fighting back against NSA surveillance. Tech maverick John McAfee recently announced that he was to fund a $100 gadget named Decentral that would sync up with a modem to thwart NSA spying and provide total anonymity.

Asked what he would do if the US government banned the product, McAfee responded, “I’ll sell it in England, Japan, the Third World. This is coming and cannot be stopped.”

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