Bitcoin’s surge past $45 each, a 250 percent gain since January (and the trajectory is up)


Most digital based currencies come and go, but it seems that Bitcoin may just stick around for a while. As of this morning, a single Bitcoin is worth about $48, which equates to a 250 percent rise in value since January.

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250 percent growth in two months in any financial market is unprecedented, and is sure to make some people very wealthy if they can figure out how to convert those digital dollars into physical assets. In just one year the humble Bitcoin has risen 800 percent or a whopping 54,900 percent since its launch back in 2009.

Among the various reason for this rise is the recent report that Bitcoin-Central has now gained status as a bank and Payment Services Provider (PSP) which means they can issue debit cards just like PayPal does now.  Here is one little snippet from the article…

Under European laws, the deal means Bitcoin-Central becomes a Payment Services Provider (PSP) that has an International Bank ID number. This puts it on an equal footing with other payment networks such as PayPal and WorldPay. As a PSP it will be able to issue debit cards, carry out real-time transfers to other banks and accept transfers into its own coffers. –source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20641465

This is a huge step forward for the alternative currency and may explain the recent serge.

Yesterday, on the Alex Jones Jones Show, Max Kieser admits he’s a “bitcoin millionnaire” (from the context I infer he means he has a million USD worth of bitcoin, although it’s probably not impossible he actually has a million BTC). He says there will be volatility, but it’s not a bubble and the trajectory is up and Bitcoin will go to $100,000 (and potentially a million, he calculates this from Bitcoin potentially capturing 1-10% of forex transactions).

  • Quote from Max: “This is what we’ve been waiting for, this is the cyberchryst moment. This is when the activists that have been pushing against the FED are going to win…”
  • Quote from Alex: “Did you just say ‘Bitcoin is the CyberChrist’ ?!?”
  • Quote from Max: “Satoshi Nakamoto is the name of the developer who created Bitcoin in 2009. I call him the CyberChrist because he potentially is so much of a game-changer, it’s such a quantum leap away from the federal reserve system that is killing economies around the world. We are going to have a massive global coming to, a understanding, a revelation that finally we are going to escape the nightmare that is the central bank system. This thing is a skyrocket and the price – yes it’s going to be volatile, so keep that in mind, you’re going to see a lot of price action – but the trajectory is up and it has the potential to go to a hundred thousand or a million per bitcoin from the $45 it’s currently at.”

What is BitCoin?

Let’s start with a definition from Investopedia:

Bitcoin is a massively disruptive innovation. The key is in the first sentence of the definition above – Bitcoin bypasses central authorities and issuers – meaning it replaces governments as the issuers of money. If it becomes widely used it will undermine the power of many of the economic policy instruments governments use today, including setting interest rates and quantitative easing. Obvously, large vested interests (e.g. the US government) will be threatened by Bitcoin and have already been working to shut the fledgling currency down, and there have been problems with hackers, and with currency bubbles, but momentum seems to be building, not faltering. For those who wish to bypass any and all centeralised authorities, this could be the most important creation in the history of man.

Using Bitcoins is as simple as getting a Bitcoin address and telling people the address. Any Bitcoins sent to that address are now yours—it is really as simple as sending a text message!

Move over gold and silver, Bitcoin is now money too.  More specifically, it is the first secure and non-inflationary money system the digital world has ever seen. Those two qualities are what gives Bitcoin it’s intrinsic value.

Bitcoin provides the best financial privacy one could possibly hope for because it is both autonomous (self-governing) and anonymous (like cash).

Good news for liberty lovers, Bitcoin spells the end of State-controlled moneyBecause Bitcoin is decentralized, there’s no banking cartel or government that’s in charge of the system. Thanks to open source programming and cryptography, this money system is both secure and democratic. One might call it the first democratic money system because there is a limited supply of Bitcoins and as a result  a) they have value and b) this value will never suffer loss due to inflation.

How To Use Bitcoin

Most articles on Bitcoin, and even the Bitcoin site itself, don’t give a clear top to bottom description of how common users of Bitcoin can put the currency to use. It is a tad confusing  if you are not familiar with how currency markets work, but not to worry, it is not as intimidating as it sounds.  Bitcoins are generated on a logarithmic scale by dedicated “miners” who run software that generate the complex hash codes which make up a Bitcoin.  Bitcoins can not be artificially inflated and require real resources (electricity and time) to produce.

Here are a few reasons why I think Bitcoins are superior to gold as medium of exchange:

1.  It is impossible to artificially inflate the supply of Bitcoins in existence.  They are produced at a known steady rate, the supply of which will eventually top out.

2.  Bitcoin transactions are made for the web!  It is impossible to actually ship gold across a wire.  The best one can do is use a medium that represents gold, such as shares of GLD, and trade those as a currency.  Clearly this leaves room for inflation of the money supply by unscrupulous bankers.  When a person transacts in Bitcoins, it is the equivalent of actually sending gold across a wire.  The unreproducible currency itself is transacted with, unlike a paper currency that represents a commodity.

3.  Bitcoins can not be confiscated since the files they reside on can be replicated and hidden in USB keys or anonymous servers.

4. The peer-to-peer nature of Bitcoin makes it as impossible to stop as BitTorrents.  Governments would have to shut down the web to stop it.

5.  It is impossible to create salted Bitcoins or “shave the edges” off of them.  There are wide spread rumors that the supply of gold that central banks are holding is loaded with tungsten bars coated in gold.

6.  Obviously they are lighter, easier to transact with, and far easier to secure than gold bullion.

Let me repeat:  Bitcoin IS NOT A PONZI – it is the same as if people were digging up gold nuggets out of the ground and then trading them as money.  Any claims that early adopters are simply promoting this as a Ponzi are like claiming people who were promoting buying Apple’s IPO were promoting a Ponzi.

Bitcoins use a 256 bit public/private key encryption algorithm that has never been cracked in practice and is considered secure by the NSA.

Bitcoins CAN NOT BE ARTIFICIALLY INFLATED.

Total Bitcoin production will TOP OUT in the future meaning NO NEW BITCOINS WILL BE CREATED BEYOND A CERTAIN DATE.

If you have additional concerns, please take the time to research the answers on your own.   Don’t blindly dismiss it because of a concern that could easily be addressed with some simple research and questioning of those who are current users of the system.

Anyone who has a thorough understanding of Austrian economics should immediately recognize the inherent benefits of Bitcoin.  Bitcoin is the equivalent of electronic gold.  Even better than gold in some respects.

Here are a few articles that cover the economics of the Bitcoin monetary system in more detail:

That said, lets go through the process of a common user setting up a Bitcoin account in an electronic bank and then purchasing some Bitcoins with US Dollars.  Then we will buy an item using the Bitcoins we just purchased.

Check out OKPay.com for a payment processing service that accepts Bitcoins and translates them directly into an e-wallet that can be accessed by a Master Card debit card anywhere in the world.

Step 1:  Setting up a Bitcoin wallet.

There are a few ways to set up a wallet.  One way is to install the Bitcoin client on your PC.  The client will automatically create a wallet address that you can accept payments to or send payments from.  The easier alternative is to simply visit the site InstaWallet and it will generate a wallet address for you as soon as you enter the site.

A wallet is simply a datafile that stores your currency.  Transactions to and from a wallet are sent via encrypted peer-to-peer network and are processed across the network, meaning there is no central banking server that a person needs to log in to.

The datafile that stores the wallet information is worth its virtual weight in gold.  If that datafile is destroyed or compromised, the money you had in that wallet will be destroyed.  This is why many people chose to store the file on their home PC rather than entrusting it to some other site owner’s care.  There are advantages and risks to storing your wallet on someone else’s site.   Storing it on someone else’s site opens your wallet up to possible confiscation by government or abuse by the site owner, but it does offer the advantage of easy access and the redundancy/backups that most site operators employ.  On your local PC, using Windows 7, the datafile is located in the hidden folder “AppData” that is under your user directory:

C:\Documents and Settings\YourUserName\Application data\BitCoin (XP)
C:\Users\YourUserName\Appdata\Roaming\BitCoin (Vista and 7)

A good idea is to have multiple wallets and multiple backups, so if one wallet is compromised or destroyed on accident, your remaining money will not be effected.  But let’s continue on using the InstaWallet example for now.

So you’ve visited InstaWallet and bookmarked your wallet’s address.  Obviously giving out the web address to a wallet on this site would give a person total access to the wallet, so don’t do that.  On the wallet page, you’ll see a public address listed that can be used for sending payments to this wallet.

My address is: “1GGatwZFsucnqbsxTHQzNUcskAqrnJTy6e”

People using Bitcoin can send Bitcoins to that address by entering it into the “Send Payment” field on InstaWallet or by entering it into their local PC client wallet which has a tab for sending payments.

It’s that easy to create a wallet and use it!

Step 2:  Adding Bitcoins to your wallet

Getting Bitcoins to spend is a touch more complicated, but it is still a fairly straight forward process.

To get Bitcoins to spend, the most common way is to purchase them on the open market.  Since there is no central banking server or exchange, one must purchase them on a private open market exchange.  The most popular exchange is Mt. Gox.

Using Mt. Gox, we first create a user account on the site.  Then we need to add some funds to it in order to purchase some Bitcoins.

After you’ve created an account and logged into it, click on the “Add Funds” button.

In order to add funds to your Mt. Gox exchange fund, you have a few options.  I will be using a Dwolla account for this example.

After creating an account on Dwolla, you can add funds to your Dwolla account directly from whatever bank you chose to bank at by adding a bank account to your Dwolla account.  You’ll need to verify the bank account by entering in the amount of the penny transactions Dwolla sends to your bank to verify that you actually own the account in question.  It may take up to 72 hours for Dwolla to send the transactions and for them to show up in your bank transaction history.  Bookmark this page and return later if you don’t already have a Dwolla account.

Clicking the link that represents your account number on the Mt. Gox “Add Funds” page under the Dwolla payment method will automatically bring up Dwolla with the appropriate transaction to Mt. Gox already formatted.  All you have to do is enter in the amount you wish to add to your Mt. Gox exchange fund and complete the transaction.

After you’ve got some funds in your Mt. Gox exchange fund, you’ll be able to buy Bitcoins on the open market.

On the Mt. Gox site, click the “Buy Bitcoins” link on the main page.  The easiest and fastest way to get coins is to simply purchase them at the current asking price, which at the time of this posting was $47.28 USD for one Bitcoin.  Mt. Gox explains how the trade transactions work here.

When buying Bitcoins, your Mt. Gox account will be debited the amount your order filled at and the Bitcoins will be sent to the address of the wallet of your choice.

Congratulations, you now have some Bitcoins to spend!

note:  It is recommended that you use a different wallet address to receive and send Bitcoins each time you make a transaction.  This is not required, but it does help maintain your anonymity by making it harder to trace your transactions through the block chain.  If a vendor knows your identity because you purchased a product from them, and you have used the same wallet address for all your transactions, the vendor would be able to see the entire transaction history for your wallet by looking at the block chain.  Look for the “New Address” button on the bottom of your Bitcoin client to get a new address.

Step 3: Securing your wallet

Older Bitcoin clients do not encrypt the wallet.dat file.  Anyone who can access it can easily steal all of your coins. Use a file encryption program if there is any chance someone might stumble upon your wallet.  The latest version of the client has built in wallet cryptography that can be enabled by clicking the menu option “Settings” -> “Encrypt Wallet”

A good practice is to keep at least two wallets, one as a “current account” for everyday transactions and one as a “savings account” where you store the majority of your Bitcoins and keep off-line.

The “savings account” wallet should be backed up in encrypted form only, and all plain text copies of this wallet should be erased. In case someone gains unauthorised access to your computer (either by physically stealing it or by exploiting a system vulnerability via the internet), they will only be able to spend the coins in your “current account” wallet.

In most operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X, simply deleting a wallet.dat file will notgenerally destroy it. It is likely that advanced tools can still be used to recover the wallet.dat file, even after it has been deleted.

For Windows, the built-in command cipher /W will shred all previously-deleted files. Rwipe or CyberShredder can securely delete individual files.

If you chose to keep your wallet on your local PC, I recommend encrypting your main wallet file that holds the bulk of your savings with TrueCrypt, and keeping an unencrypted wallet file for everyday use.  I like the idea of keeping the everyday wallet on InstaWallet, and keeping your main bank on your local PC, encrypted by TrueCrypt, and backed up onto a thumb drive.  Wallet sites like InstaWallet are still fairly new and they have not had a lot of time to prove their trustworthiness.  Use them at your own risk.

Make sure your TrueCrypt password is at least 12 characters long.  8 character passwords can be cracked easily by brute force hacking attacks.

If you really want to do some super secure transactions using Bitcoin, use the Tor web browsing network that hides your IP address from online identities to do your shopping and communicating.  Tor is a free open source project.  Learn more about it here.  Then follow the directions to anonymize your transactions here.

Other Odds And Ends:

There are other ways to acquire Bitcoins as well, such as mining for Bitcoins or purchasing them directly from other holders using sites like PayPal.  You could literally put up a post on an internet forum and ask people if they will sell their coins to you for a direct transaction through PayPal.

Mining for Bitcoins is a bit more complex and your average user shouldn’t even worry about it.  For more information on mining for Bitcoins, look here.  It used to be that a single PC could effectively mine the coins, but today, it requires a collective pool of computers or a powerhouse server to be able to mine coins at an economically efficient rate.  Mining coins is a commercial enterprise that requires excessive resources, just like mining for gold does.

Reason Magazine comments on Bitcoin:

Sites currently accepting bitcoin as payment.

Techland article on Bitcoin.

Electronic Frontier Foundation article on Bitcoin.

Anyone may freely distribute this article or use any portion of it as they see fit.  I encourage you to do so.

I have no stake in promoting this. I am not being paid to write this.  I am not receiving a commission for writing this.  I am staking my site’s reputation on promoting this because I feel the positive benefits to humanity that can arise from this currency demand that it be given public attention

4 thoughts on “Bitcoin’s surge past $45 each, a 250 percent gain since January (and the trajectory is up)

  1. Thank you for the comprehensive research! I’ve long thought a new form of currency needs to be implemented. I’m not positive Bitcoin is the solution, but at the very least, it is a wonderful start. I plan to do more research and just give it a good old fashioned try. What I’m wondering is: to obtain Bitcoin, instead of purchasing or mining, couldn’t one simply start selling product in Bitcoin currency?

    • Yes, no reason to be a bitcoin miner if you have a product or service to sell.

      Reddit, a news recommending site, and Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom announced that they will begin accepting payment in Bitcoin and transactions will be facilitated by a relatively new intermediary called Coinbase. NameCheap, a company I’ve used for over 10 years, also jumping in on the Bitcoin market and they are using BIPS.

      Basic Bitcoin payment processing with MtGox (soon to be CoinLab) or Coinbase has been free for months, and using MtGox/CoinLab directly will be cheaper than doing so through BIPS and paying its 0.89% fee. BIPS will be cheaper than BitPay for merchants converting to fiat currency, with a conversion fee of 2.50% internationally (although not cheaper than Coinbase’s 1% in the US), but for merchants who intend to receive Bitcoin directly it may be difficult to see why merchants should use BIPS instead of Coinbase or CoinLab. But where BIPS intends to make up for the costs that it does have is ease of use for the buyer and features for the sellers.

      BIPS aims to be the last Bitcoin website you will ever need, and with them you get a free Bitcoin eWallet on top of their merchant solutions. BIPS is the first major Bitcoin gateway to offer merchant tools completely for free. As long as you keep your balance as Bitcoins then you pay zero processing fees. You only have to pay if you want to cash out to your local currency.

      BIPS gives you the option to automatically convert some of or all the Bitcoins coming into your account to your local currency. Any automatic conversion to local currency at the time of purchase is guaranteed at the rate it was processed for. This means you can accept Bitcoins without worrying about exchange rates.

      Check it out: https://bips.me/
      More info: http://goo.gl/axzBV

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